maya-program

The Polasek House

The course introduced the student to the practical aspects of field recording of structures, using examples of significant historic merit. The survey techniques were those developed by the Historic American Building Survey, a part of the National Park Service. The final product of the course was developed to HABS standards, with the intention of submitting them to the annual Charles Peterson Prize competition and the Library of Congress as part of the HABS National Archive. At the end of the course the student was familiar with safe field survey procedures, field note preparation, photography in support of recording, and the development of precise record drawings, the organization of field records, site photographs, and documentary support data to HABS standards. The student also became aware of emerging techniques for field recording and drawings preparation. By definition, field documentation is a team activity and the student learns effective communication techniques, professional responsibility and team management. The field supervisor was David G. Woodcock, and the team members included Fareena Abbas, Marcelo Campos, Bradley Davis, Andrew Immroth, Thomas McPeek, Kelli Peters.

The house was one of several owned by the Hoting family. Purchased by Mrs. Lillie D. Kramer in 1950, who sold it to Bennie and Annie Polasek in 1993, who gave the house to the Burleson County Czech Heritage Museum in 1996. The house is a five-roomed wood-framed structure, with cypress siding, windows and doors. The 1896 Sanborn map indicates a wood shingle roof, and shows a porch on the West side. The interior has painted wood walls and ceilings, though the large South room was always papered over wide cedar boards, and has grained wood doors, windows and base boards. The East room has an elegant beaded ceiling, and evidence of two corner closets from floor to ceiling. County records to not indicate a date for the house, but it is likely to have been started in the later half of the 19th century, perhaps as a two-room structure.